If It Rained on the Mesa 18×24 Oil Painting

This is an 18 X 24 inch oil painting of part of the mesa to the north of my house.  It is called Petroglyph National Monument.  I was imagining what it would look like if we got lots of rain.  With all the construction and people living closer to the monument, there are lots of flowers being planted in home landscape.  The seeds should be spreading all over by wind and birds.  I wonder how the vegetation might change if we got more rain.  Last year we had a crop of wild sunflowers at the Petroglyphs and it was beautiful!  This painting is called “High Desert, If it Rained on the Mesa”.

You can see the video of the Petroglyph sunflowers here:  Sunflower fields pop up at Petroglyphs.

Advertisements

41 thoughts on “If It Rained on the Mesa 18×24 Oil Painting

  1. Hi Dawn, so pleased to have found your blog, and welcome to mine. This is beautiful, a great choice of colours, not colours I often think of using in combination, but gosh you have proved how well these strong bold colours can work together, thank you for sharing, I feel happy this morning for seeing this cheery painting. I use a combo a flit between wet in wet, and layering….still learning oils, I suppose we all are? I have just made the move to large canvases, I used to stick to a about A3, but recently I have gone big, eek, actually it’s ok, it’s more a problem having the space as I paint in the living room! Have a great day. Bec

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Bec. Thank you very much and thank you for dropping by. I absolutely love bold color and though I have started out paintings with every intent of toning it done, I always change my mind and it ends up being my obnoxious colors again. Must be my “thing”. I can’t seem to get away from it.

      What is smallest painting I have done was 8×10 but that canvas was a gift. I usually stick to 11×14 to 18×24. Storage, costs of supplies are part of the reason for that, but the biggest thing I think right now is that I paint in one sitting and I don’t know if I could finish something bigger before the paint started getting tacky.

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Which oils do you use dawn? Mine are wet for days, unless it is the background with thinners, I use original liquin for top layer glazing. Interesting thought to do it start to finish in one setting, I guess I do kind of, as the horse under painting was all done in one go, just shows that going back over it days later can wreck a painting. I might have to take a note from your book and complete in one sitting.

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I just use Windsor and Newton regular old oil paints. Mostly Winton, the student grade because I use so much paint. I am a fan of wet on wet. I use turpenoid for the bare bones underpainting and to clean the brushes and a mixture of 50/50 linseed/turpenoid if I need to thin out paint a bit.

          Liked by 1 person

        2. I use lemon yellow with phthalo blue to make turquoise and that is about all I use it for. I just bought a different brand last night, just the Blick studio brand. I hope it is a better. Should be here next week.

          Liked by 1 person

        3. How exciting, I used a blue. green and white to get a turquoise, but I guess it depends on the depth you require, …..lol my daughter says she would not call the colour I mixed turquoise, oh I give up, lol….new supplies is always exciting, I wish we had a blick store in the uk

          Liked by 1 person

        4. I bought a tube of green paint a long time ago. When I started painting again, it was all dried out and I have never bought more. I was using mixes of cerulean, cobalt and cad yellow light or phthalo blue and cad yellow light and white to vary the shades. It was not working! think someone suggested the phthalo and lemon on wet canvas? Anyway, I tried it and I really like the turquoise and teals you get with those two.

          Liked by 1 person

        5. Lololol. Help me out here. I didn’t understand!!! So you have Winton, but also bar gregorian which you have not opened? Did I get that right? I was just looking at the gregorian paint at Jerry’s Artorama. I like the prices! Wonder if it is any better than what I currently use. Hmmmmm.

          Liked by 1 person

        6. Yes sorry it did predictive winton, not wonton!! I have a number of tubes of Georgian oil paint, they don’t appear as stiff, and yes very reasonably priced, I had them in a set, I did actually buy a buff titanium the other day, also Georgian, just because it was not available in the usual brand. I also have a couple of Bob Ross, also nice.

          Like

        7. Mine seem to get a little tacky at about 24 hours. I can work with it, but I prefer not to. 48 hours…negative. Very tacky. Or at least it seems to me.

          Liked by 1 person

        8. Sorry, I keep coming up with question but what kind of oil paint do you use and do you like it? I think Winton lemon yellow is horrible. Really bad tinting power, seems like low pigment strength. Do you have a recommendation for that color that won’t break the bank?

          Like

        9. Liquin is a great medium, it speeds drying, and helps with fine detail, there are two types, one is more fluid, ( original) as I do lots of animals it is fantastic for hair, eyes etc, and because it dries fast I can go over with the next colour to build up the layers of hair. It kind of helps level out, so by keeping the paint flat also helps with trying time. I don’t think it is too different from other oil mediums, I would like to try walnut oil, to compare the effect. I really don’t know the technical stuff about this, I just like it ( it was recommended to me by an artist who has had works in the national portrait gallery, he lives near to me, and creates highly detailed work. Jason Sullivan)

          Liked by 1 person

        10. I have not used the liquin whilst wet on wet, but I do recommend it, if you ever try painting layers.
          Because I usually paint a background first ( thinners and oil) then an under painting, ( often thinners and oil) next layer, filling in, (liquin and oil), maybe a last layer tweaking, adding detail……if hair/ fur is involved I could do another four layers, allowing to dry overnight between each. My layers are very thin, so I don’t have to wait too long for drying….I learnt that thin layers worked better for me after waiting over a month for a painting to be touch dry, annoying! This is why I have a few on the go at any one time, all at different stages, other wise I could get bored. It does however mean I start favouring certain paintings, and loose motivation on others as I find I gel with some more than others, dependant on my mood.

          Liked by 1 person

  2. I agree with Judith, this is not only well painted, but it feels surreal. I really like it Dawnmarie. (Can I call you Dawn for short?) Have you always painted large like this? I really admire people who can paint big. I don’t know how to do this lol. Really cool, I hope to see more of this in your work!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Laura. Yes, call me Dawn. Dawn Marie is when I am in trouble.

      I do paint bigger but the cost of canvas really explodes after a certain size…like after 18 X 24 and I paint in one sitting, so I need to be able to finish by bedtime. I have been painting small lately because of cost and storage space and I paint so much that I can’t afford to paint big all the time. I try to stick to 11 X 14, 14 X 18, 16×20 and 20×24. I have done 24 X 36 on several occasions. I will post one of those next week for you maybe.

      You can paint bigger. Everyone can paint bigger. It is just a matter of doing and being willing to pay for the supplies. Be and do. But it certainly hurts a lot less to throw away an 11 X 14 than it does an 18 X 24 or 24 X 36…

      Liked by 1 person

      1. 8×10 seems big to me right now! But yeah I hear what you say about cost and that. Makes a lot of sense. I’m so used to working so small. I admire you guys who can do awesome large stuff. So you paint a large painting all in one day? How do you do that, fast-drying oils?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. Alla Prima…wet on wet is the name of the game. I think it might be called direct painting also. Who knows!!! I don’t even know if that is spelled right. I have tried letting paintings dry then working on them but I am in love with the way wet paint blends together and how the last layer you painted kinda mixes with the upper layer. It looks artsy to me or something. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wet-on-wet

          Liked by 1 person

        2. Oh, got it. Ok. For some reason I thought oils had to be applied on top of dry paint only. I know nothing about art, truly. I really just like making it. I could tell you almost nothing about other artists’ work. I have always hated history of any kind. Starting to get more of an interest now but only a glimmer. Interesting and I appreciate you sharing that info. Nice to keep learning!

          Liked by 1 person

        3. People tell me that but small is easy. I don’t know. It’s right in front of me and just a flick here and there. Bigger is intimidating. Idk if I’ll ever be a large painter. I see what you’re saying but man. It’s not just a matter of painting what I’m painting and making it larger. Not to me, anyway.

          Liked by 1 person

        4. You are right, it is not just painting bigger. It also seems like the bigger things are, it is easy to distort them so you have to be careful. I know you can paint bigger though. It is just more of what you do already…just a learning process.

          Liked by 1 person

  3. I love the painting, and even more, I love the imaginative, speculative quality behind it. You’re truly sharing a unique and very personal vision. Some artists are content with showing the world as it is. I like that you’re showing it as it could be.

    Like

Comments are closed.